What to Wear #39: Roses

Not actual roses, though that would be cool, but I woke up with roses in my head and I have previously mentioned on this blog the special meaning that they hold for me. It’s going to be another warm day, so a sleeveless outfit is the desired choice, but with evening weather changes possible, black leggings will join this slightly shorter dress, and some beaded green earrings picking up on the tone of the leaves on the dress. I find tones of green work with most flower-patterned items. You know, flowers, leaves, nature, green etc.

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What to Wear #38: Because I’m a Disney Princess, That’s Why!

Yes, this is indeed what is printed on one of my favourite T-shirts ever. I found it on Visual Statements and it basically provides an answer to any “Why…?” question people might ask regarding your actions/ tastes/ activities etc. When you get tired of answering yourself, just point to the T-shirt. Accessorizing with one of my favourite scarves (most likely found at C&A) and a pair of earrings that reminds me of summer and a good friend’s wedding.

What to Wear #37: Mischief Managed

I do own clothes to wear them repeatedly, not just once, hence today’s choice is the Marauder’s Map dress I have already had the pleasure of mentioning on this blog. I’m not sure if I’m up to no good, but then I’ll know for sure only when I put on the dress.

It’s a comfortable fit and provides built-in reading entertainment should it be too crowded on the bus to take my book out of my bag. I have yet to locate Harry. Map-wiping for two different looks is not included yet, but I’m sure someone’s working on it. Then again, I don’t have a wand, but maybe a non-verbal spell would work.

The dress laces up in the back, so it’s better to get that set before you put it on, making sure that the dress both fits well and you can still out it on/ take it off without having to undo your hard work with the strings.

Knee-length black leggings will join the ensemble for that ever-present possibility of a strong breeze in the lovely city of Hamburg, as well as these earrings I grabbed on sale a couple of months ago (most like in SIX or one of the usual suspects), a ring that reminds me of my visit to Harry Potter: The Exhibition in Paris and a dab of lipgloss. Ready to geek! I mean, ready to go.

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Marble Painting for Beginners

Thanks to a friend I happened on Studio 42 in Hamburg and took their class on marble painting. Result: it’s addictive! While doing it does require some space and covering up to avoid a mess, the whole process is exciting and even a little addictive. Obviously there are various levels to the technique and the creations that full-time marble painting artists come up with are mind-blowing. But those of us just starting out or looking for some artsy, creative enjoyment can proceed with full assurance of producing a unique, (mostly) abstract print full of colours playing off each other.

Read below to see one example of how you can do your own bit of marble painting.

What you need:

Rectangular shallow basin or tray – size depends on the paper size you’ll be using for your painting

Bigger basin

Glass sheet

Drying rack

Drawing paper

Old newspapers

Acrylic paints

Paintbrushes

Toothpics

Water

Bowl

Thin sponge

Thin rubber gloves from a pharmacy

Aluminium sulfate

Ox gall

Step by step:

  1. Fill your tray or basin with water, but not all the way to the brim, leaving an inch or two.
  2. Add the ox gall to the water (if you Google this, you might find that opinions differ on how much to add and whether to add any to the tray at all – take your pick!)
  3. Put on the rubber gloves.
  4. Mix your colours in small jars or containers using the acrylic paints and add bottled water so that it will be possible to shake/ spray the paint on the surface of the water later on.
  5. Mark one side of your sheet of paper with an X.
  6. Dissolve the aluminium sulfate in a bowl of water (ditto on the amounts in terms of different opinions), soak the sponge in it and wet both sides of the paper with wide, even strokes.
  7. Set paper aside to dry.
  8. Dip the brush in the prepared colour you want to start with. Hold the brush in one hand, positioned above the surface of the water, and gently, but firmly tap it against the index and middle finger of your other hand. Ideally, paint splotches will fly off the brush and settle on the water’s surface. Repeat this with several colours. Use a toothpic to create patterns.
  9. Turn the sheet of paper with the side marked X facing up towards you, take the bottom corner on one side and the upper corner on the other, and lower the sheet, placing it on the surface of the water.
  10. After a few seconds, pick up the sheet by both upper corners, and transer it to the board or sheet of glass in the larger basin. Douse with water to get rid of excess paint, then carefully transfer to drying rack. Use wide strips of old newspaper to skim the surface of the water in the tray before the next session.

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All photos by @juniperlu

Siren

Well, this is certainly attention-grabbing. While mermaids have long since been part of popular culture across the world and enjoyed regular depiction in various interpretations in literature, TV and film, it looks like the momentum is gaining with the upcoming 2018 addition of a new TV show. But unlike the bright colours and sunny summery vibe of the popular Australian teen show H2O: Just Add Water, Siren aims at dark, mysterious and even scary.

The setting for the show is a fishing town, Bristol Cove, with some dark history as far as mermaids are concerned. We can expect a case of the past not staying hidden, however long ago that past took place, and erupting in all sorts of hair-raising ways. Mysterious new arrival in the form of an unusual-looking young woman, a town rooted in murder and all that thrashing in the water we see in the trailer – it’s not mythical, it’s real! “What would it take for you to believe me?”